December 2014

Lighthouse offers free TCO calculation: datacenter on premise vs in the cloud

by Luc Van Haver

Belgian companies also benefit significantly from IT migration to the public cloud

Business operations nowadays are influenced by the four major new IT trends also known as The Nexus of Forces: Mobile, Social Media, Big Data and the one they are all powered by: Cloud Computing. As a result the IT landscape changes drastically and (public) cloud will be introduced on a large scale the upcoming months and years.

Yet a recent Eurostat study concludes that a lack of knowledge is the number one argument holding back enterprises from using the public cloud.

Lighthouse, a Cronos Group initiative, wants to inform you through professional consultancy on the latest cloud opportunities and challenges in a rapidly evolving and changing cloud landscape.

As an introduction Lighthouse offers Belgian headquartered companies a free TCO calculation comparing an on-premise datacenter with a similar setup in the cloud .

Confirm your interest by sending an email to lighthouse@cronos.be

 

Cloud Deployment Models in Human

by Luc Van Haver

In a recent news release Eurostat, statistics provider of the European Commission, concludes that lack of knowledge still is the enterprises’ main reason for not using cloud services.

There is still a Babylonian confusion when talking about on premise IT infrastructure and cloud deployment models. Therefore I think it is time for a translation in human. Let’s compare the need for IT with the need for transportation.

When your enterprise needs transportation (company cars) for its business you have a variety of options to fulfill this:

 

  1. You can buy the needed amount of cars (= On Premise IT). You would have to calculate the amount of cars you need upfront (including potential peaks in need), budget them, order them, make them ready to use, think of a way to prevent them of being stolen and maintain them (or not). This is all in all a time consuming process BUT you will own the cars and you can do pretty much whatever you want with them.
  2. You could purchase a whole car park at once or engage a company to do that for you and organize it in a way that departments in your company can rent a car when they need one and pay for it only when they are using it (= Private Cloud). The cars will never be used by someone outside your company, so they are reserved for you. You would still need to consider the total amount of cars to be bought or reserved upfront including potential peaks. You will pay for the cars you do not use and it will take a while to obtain extra cars.
  3. You could make a deal with one or more other companies to share the concept described under 2 (= Community Cloud). The cars can be used by all (and limited to only) the companies included in the deal. Benefits can be optimization of the resources and sharing the cost of unused capacity.
  4. You could choose not to make any upfront investments at all and work together with one or more vendors that rent cars (= Public Cloud). You would pick any available model from their catalogue at any time of the day or night and as many as you need. All models are instantly available (within minutes), you always get the latest model and you don’t need to bother about maintenance, insurance, fuel,… BUT the car you have used can also be rented to other people you don’t know whenever you are not using the car. Cars can be added automatically when the need increases suddenly and vice versa. Levels of exclusivity often can be discussed, but everything comes with a price.
  5. Any combination of the concepts described in 2. to 5. would be called hybrid concepts (= Hybrid Cloud)

 

I’m aware that purists would want to add remarks and suggest completions to my comparison, creating yet another Babylonian confusion. For a novice in the cloud landscape however it is probably a useful handhold.

 

 

Cloudar is Hiring

 

Cloudar, part of the Cronos Group NV,  is a Belgian Managed Service Provider offering
rock solid cloud solutions for any type of business. They design, build and operate high available and scalable cloud environments based on Amazon Web Services (AWS).

They are currently looking for a Cloud & DevOps Engineer. Read all about is here